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Fresh to the Field

Diana Anghel

There are challenges and rewards that come with being a freshman on a Varsity team.

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Varsity teams are most commonly made up of upperclassmen, and while that rule stands for most high schools, there are exceptions. Sometimes, a freshman breaks the stereotype and impresses the coach enough to be placed on Varsity despite the age gap found between them and other teammates. The Chicago Exact Sports website advises athletes to follow five steps when trying to make a Varsity team: consistently repeating the action of playing the sport, playing during the offseason, conditioning during the offseason, watching dietary intake and making a good impression.

Sam Champney and Kacey Meltzer, freshmen on the girls Varsity soccer team, have both proven themselves to be familiar with these steps. As being part of the team requires advanced maturity and cooperation, the girls have found themselves being challenged and sometimes stressed.

“The toughest part is proving yourself,” Meltzer said. “Everything you do has to be proving that you want that spot on Varsity, that you want to play.”

As obvious as it is, Varsity spots are wanted by many others involved in the sport. When a freshman takes a spot on the team, working to keep it is vital.

“We have to stand on the sidelines, and watch what we say,” Meltzer said. “We have to make sure we don’t goof around, are always on task and trying our hardest.”

Although being a freshman on Varsity is difficult and stressful, it also comes with many advantages, such as increasing skills at a faster and more advanced pace.

“I was really excited [when I made Varsity] because I was getting an opportunity to play with the older girls and I knew I would get better playing at the higher level,” Champney said.

Though she wasn’t confident when tryouts first began, she gained confidence as the days went on.

“I feel very lucky and I’m appreciative that I get to be with theVarsity team,” Champney said.

Practicing with Varsity also means having to learn play strategies that other players are already used to, and learning valuable lessons. Meltzer referred to doing everything for the team as the most important thing she has learned.

“Our motto is basically to play for the team, to play hard and to not play selfishly,” Meltzer said. “Every move you make is for the team.”

Overall, being part of the Varsity girls soccer team as freshmen has challenged both Champney and Meltzer, but getting this opportunity has taught them valuable lessons and gave them an advantage over other underclassmen.

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1 Comment

One Response to “Fresh to the Field”

  1. Bonnie Hunwardsen on May 18th, 2017 7:35 pm

    Samie,
    We are so proud of you. You will do a great job. Hopefully Uncle Don and I can come in watch you play one of your games.
    Great job
    Aunt Bonnie and Uncle Don

    [Reply]

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