Max Schewitz visits ACHS

619 students participate in an EKG test offered by the Max Schewitz Foundation.

The+Max+Schewitz+Foundation+is+located+in+Lake+County.+The+foundation+screens+the+hearts+of+students.+They%27re+goal+is+to+catch+undetected+heart+problems+that+could+potentially+be+lethal.+
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Max Schewitz visits ACHS

The Max Schewitz Foundation is located in Lake County. The foundation screens the hearts of students. They're goal is to catch undetected heart problems that could potentially be lethal.

The Max Schewitz Foundation is located in Lake County. The foundation screens the hearts of students. They're goal is to catch undetected heart problems that could potentially be lethal.

Courtesy of Max Schewitz Foundation

The Max Schewitz Foundation is located in Lake County. The foundation screens the hearts of students. They're goal is to catch undetected heart problems that could potentially be lethal.

Courtesy of Max Schewitz Foundation

Courtesy of Max Schewitz Foundation

The Max Schewitz Foundation is located in Lake County. The foundation screens the hearts of students. They're goal is to catch undetected heart problems that could potentially be lethal.

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The Max Schewitz Foundation visited Antioch Community High School on October 9, 2019. The foundation has a mission to help as many students as possible. The foundation was created after the sudden passing of Max Schewitz after failing to be diagnosed with a heart arrhythmia. Max’s mother, Mary Beth Schewitz, wanted to do all she could to make sure that no one would have to experience a death of a child, friend, brother or loved one. 

Alane Church’s son, Joshua Church, passed away suddenly from a hidden heart condition that was undetectable with a stethoscope. Since her son’s death, she has been helping with the Max Schewitz foundation by going to schools and telling her story as well as assisting with the EKG screening.

“The amount of lives we’ve saved since Josh died, I just know he would be cheering,” Church said. “When we hit a pothole in life we have a choice, we can choose to be bitter or better. Every day I am trying to choose better.” 

After hearing Max and Josh’s story, many kids decided to be proactive and participate in the heart screening. 

“I wanted to get an EKG test because I feel like it is important to track your health even if it is a check up and everything feels fine,” senior Nayla Loos said. “If there is a way to prevent bad things from happening, I don’t see why somebody wouldn’t take advantage of it.”

With the help of 32 volunteers to help set up and assist with the heart screening, they found no serious heart conditions with any of the students that were tested. Since the foundation was created in 2006, they have performed approximately 87,706 EKG tests to local young adults at north suburban high schools, colleges and sports clubs. They also received a Heart Saver Hero Award from Lt. Gov. Pat Quinn in February of 2007. 

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