The Holiday Revolved Around Bad Luck

The Ides of March is a day most known from Shakespeare’s play, Julius Caesar.

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The Holiday Revolved Around Bad Luck

A collection of William Shakespeare's play books.

A collection of William Shakespeare's play books.

Lena De Vore

A collection of William Shakespeare's play books.

Lena De Vore

Lena De Vore

A collection of William Shakespeare's play books.

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The Ides of March, March 15, a day rooted in infamy. The Ides of March is the day on the Roman calendar that Julius Caesar was assassinated by his senators and former friends. Caesar was stabbed 23 times and eventually died near the Theatre of Pompey in Rome.

There have been several works which mimic the historic events but none so famous as William Shakespeare’s, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar. Most people remember the popular phrase “Beware the ides of March,” which is stated twice in the play by the Soothsayer, who warns Caesar of bad luck and betrayal coming his way, in this instance indicating his death.

This play is one of Shakespeare’s few plays that is based on true events in Roman history. As a Roman politician, military general and historian who helped develop the rise of the Roman Empire, Caesar was influential in the empire’s basis. Due to this, his assassination was a major turning point in Roman history.

“I think it’s not a real holiday in society because it is about the loss of a hero and his life and we should celebrate on a different day, [Caesar’s] life,” sophomore Zoey Kue said. “It is sad to think that someone lost their life due to greed and we should not have to celebrate that.”

According to LiveScience, in modern times, March 15 is considered to be an unlucky day. The idea goes all the way back to ancient traditions and superstitions, including Caesar’s death.

Although it may not be an official holiday, many history and literature enthusiasts still celebrate it each year. This day will always be linked to misfortune thanks to Caesar and Shakespeare.

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