Sports Medicine Looks to Give Students Real World Experiences

The group behind the players hopes to be seen as more than support.

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Certain athletic events, such as football, get a lot of recognition from the community, but the people who aid them get seemingly minimal to none. The Sports Medicine Club at Antioch Community High School benefits not just the school, but also the community as well. The only downfall is not many truly realize how much this club benefits everyone.

Senior Emily Higgins has been in the club for four years. When the club was initially proposed, she was the last signature that allowed the club to form.

 

“Our job as sports medicine students is to assist them [athletic trainers] in any way possible,” Higgins said. “If they need water to be filled for the games, we’ll fill it. If [the trainers] need help with rehab and there are 20 kids in the training room, then they’ll say, ‘hey Emily, can you go walk athlete A through a couple of hip exercises?’ and we will.”

Joaquin Barba, a sophomore surrounded by the medical field due to his parents occupation, desires to join them in the medical field when he is older. He is also an active member in the club.

“[Sports Medicine Club] benefits the community as a whole because it puts more people out there with knowledge of how to help people, even if there are some people in this club that aren’t going to go into the medical field when they get older,” Barba said. 

Sports Medicine Club mainly benefits Sequoit athletes.

“People going to athletic events don’t normally see what goes on behind the field or court,” Higgins said. “You might have a kicker or a setter get  injured, but there’s always a person behind the scenes helping those athletes get better.”

Freshman Emily Kaluzinski is a newcomer to the Sports Medicine Club, but she doesn’t think any different from veteran members Higgins and Barba. All three know sports medicine is needed.

“Sports medicine is important because it helps engage students by doing different medical activities,” Kaluzinski said. Through this club all of us have the opportunity to expand our knowledge and interest in what we want to do in the future.”

The club meets every Thursday after school and is welcoming new members throughout the winter sport season.

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