What to Know About Triple Jump

In track and field, triple jump is a more unique event than the others.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






USA%27s+Christian+Taylor+jumps+for+the+gold+medal+in+triple+jump+at+the+Rio+Olympics.
Back to Article
Back to Article

What to Know About Triple Jump

USA's Christian Taylor jumps for the gold medal in triple jump at the Rio Olympics.

USA's Christian Taylor jumps for the gold medal in triple jump at the Rio Olympics.

© AFP/Getty Images

USA's Christian Taylor jumps for the gold medal in triple jump at the Rio Olympics.

© AFP/Getty Images

© AFP/Getty Images

USA's Christian Taylor jumps for the gold medal in triple jump at the Rio Olympics.

In track and field, there are three different jumping events: long jump, high jump and triple jump. The one that is the most unique is the triple jump. Triple jump is a very technical event, unlike long jump. Triple jump involves jumping three times, instead of one, before launching oneself into the pit.

The first part of triple jump is finding out which foot to use when the athlete finishes the jump. The most naturally dominant foot is the one that is used first. Once one figures out which foot to use the athlete needs a good running start so they can then propel themselves. Eight or nine steps are typically used for a solid running start. When the jump starts, an athlete must jump long and far; not up. For the second jump, an athlete needs to stay in the air for as long as they possibly can. For the final jump, the athlete must jump as high as they possibly can. The moment that has been formed up to that time will launch the runner a far distance.

After the jump, walk out of the back of the pit. The farthest mark in the sand behind the athlete is the measurement the officials will use for the jump.

Senior Brandon Etayem has been triple jumping all of his four years in high school. He recommends that an athlete participates in triple jump over any of the other jumping events.

“I like that it’s more technique than talent based,” Etayem said. “If you can get the technique down you’re going to be good whether you have the size or the build.”  

Etayem went on to say the technique may be difficult to learn at first. The style used is not very natural, a runner needs to find their own style that they are comfortable using. Once that is found, they can be successful.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email